All posts tagged: Shepherds Purse

Bert’s Barrow – Love Farm Shop

You know how I crave locally sourced food – I’ve just discovered a whole barrow of it at a super farm shop, in the delightful North Yorkshire countryside. Bert’s Barrow, near Hillam, North Yorkshire Started up by Marlene and Ian (Bert) Thompson with a cart at the side of the road and an honesty box, they sold locally sourced seasonal vegetables in aid of the village defibrillator fund. Now a new farm shop is tucked into an original barn with hens roaming outside in the area where you can sit and enjoy an ice cream. The family, Charlotte Wells Thompson and Jason Thompson are now developing the farm shop and a veg box delivery service with plans passed for a tea room…Whoop!! The welcome on entering the shop is warm and friendly, and inside the door sits Bert’s original cart. It is piled up with tempting locally sourced food products and at the rear of the shop is a mouth-watering display of seasonal fruit and vegetables. You just know that produce available in farm shops is …

Katy’s White Lavender Cheese For Lunch

The other day I wrote about accepting that January will never be the cheeriest of months. Even though I do miss the sunshine sometimes, the dark months can bring me calmness and peace, especially when I can light up lots of candles and hunker down and write. Maybe the sun today put a smile on my face and a spring in my step, and I decided a healthy salad would be ideal for a working lunch. I also promised a review of Shepherds Purse Katy’s White Lavender cheese. Katy’s White lavender is a lovely fresh white sheep milk cheese that has been rolled in English lavender to mature. The maturation period allows the lavender to infuse through the cheese. The result is a delicate fragrant taste combining with the meadowy sweetness of the ewe’s milk cheese. So I thought, perfect as an addition to a lunch salad. Simply toss grapes onto peppery rocket leaves, crumble over Katy’s White Lavender cheese, top with toasted flaked almonds and a drizzle of honey and mustard dressing. This combination …

Yorkshire Cheese

When it comes to a long history of cheese-making, Yorkshire certainly has one: following the Norman invasion in 1066, many French Cistercian monks came over to set up the huge monastic estates which have dominated the Yorkshire dales for centuries (famous abbeys such as Jervaulx, Fountains and Bolton).  The monks also brought cheese making techniques, which they put to good use making firm, crumbly cheeses throughout the dales: Nidderdale, Wensleydale, Teesdale, Swaledale and Coverdale, each similar to the others.  These Yorkshire cheeses were often made from sheep’s milk, firm and loose textured with a moistness and rich blue marbling, tasting, apparently, “finer than Stilton”. After the dissolution of the monasteries, cheese making continued in Yorkshire, with production moving to the farms as recipes were passed on to farmers’ wives.  With time these cheeses began to change, farmers started to farm cows, and advances in cheese-making, coupled with a desire to make consistent, recognisable cheeses, meant the dales cheeses became firmer, drier and sharper – like the crumbly, white Wensleydale we know today. This move towards …